Data Centre/Commercial

Scale-out cloud deployment on 64-bit ARM servers showcased

Commercial CBR Staff Writer

14:01, May 28 2014

Applied Micro Circuits and Canonical will release Icehouse, the latest OpenStack release using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in a KVM virtualised environment.

Applied Micro Circuits (AMCC) and Canonical are planning to showcase first production software deployment on 64-bit Arm servers.

They will release their Icehouse, the latest OpenStack release using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in a KVM virtualised environment on an X-Gene-based server rack, using Ubuntu's orchestration tool Juju, MAAS to orchestrate applications, databases and services.

Both the companies are demonstrating that the scale-out cloud services can be availed on 64-bit ARM architecture.

AppliedMicro vice president Gaurav Singh said: "We are pleased to offer the first ARM 64-bit Server-on-a-Chip production silicon with full certification for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, including all the relevant server workloads and tools to allow commercial hyperscale deployments on X-Gene.

"The X-Gene plus Ubuntu offering means enterprises can now capture substantial TCO savings for their scale-out data centers."

Canonical Hyderscale VP Christian Reis said Ubuntu is the primary platform for the cloud -- public, private or hybrid.

"Working with Applied Micro, we have delivered to the ARM ecosystem the ability to orchestrate server workloads at scale. X-Gene and Ubuntu provide a perfect platform for companies considering hyperscale deployments: outstanding performance, disruptive economics and fully automated management," Reis said.

Other applications onboard will include Elasticsearch, SugarCRM, Kibana, Logstash, Hadoop and MediaWiki.

The demonstration follows the development of AppliedMicro's ARM 64-bit server technology and its inclusion in Canonical's Ubuntu OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL).

Both the companies are planning to product roadmap for the X-Gene SoC Cloud ServerTM solution which includes production of X-Gene and updates on X-Gene 2.


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