Teenage love to drive UK message traffic to 300bn

App Dev and SOA

by CBR Staff Writer| 06 August 2014

About half a million young Brits sending several thousands of messages every month.

Mobile messaging apps, including WhatsApp, iMessage and Facebook Messenger are all set to double the overall UK mobile messaging traffic to 300bn by this Christmas than 2013, a new report noted.

Deloitte's latest study noted that with more than 270 updates being sent on a typical day by new smartphone owner, and the trend is claimed to be 'driven by young love'.

Deloitte technology, media and telecoms research head Paul Lee told the Guardian: "Teenage romance is appropriating technology for its needs.

"A constant among humans is courting and they use different tools to do it. It used to be hanging on the phone, now its instant messaging."

Furthermore, the report added that an average Brit composes and sends seven text messages per day, with 46 instant messages sent per day on an average.

In the yet to be published study, Deloitte estimates a small percentage of Brits being super-users, with about half a million young Brits sending several thousands of messages every month.

Last year, the volume of instant messages (IMs) surpassed the old fashioned text last year with 145bn texts sent, while texting is anticipated to drop for the first time since its creation in 1992, with Deloitte projecting a plunge to 140bn.

Lee added: "What they are doing with that acquisition is capturing the flow of conversations.

"Some of their users have gone from talking on Facebook to talking on WhatsApp.

"By acquiring WhatsApp they keep those users."

As part of efforts to bolster messaging, Facebook poached PayPal boss; Twitter enhanced its direct messaging service as well as launched new private messaging app; and Secure Haze launched new secure app to take on Facebook's WhatsApp.

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